Economics With Financial Literacy

The Crisis of Flint Michigan and How It Hurts Us All

395 million.

It costs 395 million dollars to save Flint

Or, in more recognizable terms, 131% of the entire Kardashian families net worth that continues to grow yearly.

Or, 1/1515.18th of the US’ military budget

Or, or 1/8.86th of our presidents net worth

Or, in the simplest terms, a completely and entirely doable task. A task so seemingly simple that it seems like it should be done by now. Why isn’t it?

Greed. Greed is why.

Greed is why Governor Snyder gave the poorest, blackest area of Michigan the most at risk water supply and gave Michigan corporations huge tax breaks and gave the rich huge tax breaks.

Greed is why people are dying in their homes that they can’t sell because the homes water supply is unsafe, so poor residents in black cities are trapped in their homes as their kids brains die from lead poisoning, why people are avoiding drinking water at all costs.

But why does this impact you? How can something in a state you may not live in hurt you?

It’s what they did. It’s what they’ve shown. They’ve shown if you’re poor and black you are not safe in their hands, they have shown if you live in a poor black area your water could be contaminated. They’ve shown their tax breaks mean more than your brain cells. This is a human issue because we are losing other humans over the deliberate lack of care for poor black residents. We are a community of humans who realize we aren’t safe under the rich, that they have their boot on our necks. Unless you’re rich, living in a historically white area you are not safe from this. Your republican representatives are not fighting for you, they’re fighting for the corporations.

What can you do?

  • CALL YOUR REPRESENTITIVE. Even if you don’t mention a bill (it’s better if you do0 call them. Call them outraged. Call their secretaries and tell their secretaries how awful this is. Call your representatives through 8508989912. Better yet- look through their record. If they have a history of voting for atrocious budget allocations like the one that caused flint to tell them, I will not vote for your re-election. Tell their secretaries, too. Tell them you’re keeping an eye on them and what they vote to do.
  • VOTE: vote for every local representative you possibly can. Put your voting ballot where your priorities are. Issues like this come from apoliticism, people who vote once every four years and act like they made a difference, that is not how things work. VOTE.
  • SEND WATER AND SUPPLIES TO FLINT:

SOURCES:

http://michaelmoore.com/10FactsOnFlint/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Snyder

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/05/19/michigan-corporations-pay-0-taxes-year-despite-crises-flint-and-detroit

https://www.nationalpriorities.org/campaigns/military-spending-united-states/

https://www.forbes.com/profile/donald-trump/

http://time.com/4441471/flint-water-lead-poisoning-costs/

http://www.instyle.co.uk/celebrity/news/the-kardashian-rich-list-what-are-they-all-worth-individually

Economics With Financial Literacy

The Result of the Bush and Obama Era Economic Stimulus Packages

An assignment for Honors Economics, lesson 4.05, by Sarah Knezel

The Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 was an act that gave middle and working class citizens an extra 300 to 600 dollars in their tax returns, with the intention of the citizens using it to stimulate the economy to fight the results of a recession, with a projected cost of 152 billion dollars, yearly. It is unknown what exact percentage of the budget it consumed for the 2 years it was active. For all it cost to the taxpayer, and the controversy surrounding it, was it worth it?


    

In my opinion, a bill is empowered by its intentions, this bill was a success by most measures. Its impact on the GDP was immaculate, and by any professional opinion that is good, domestic manufacturing must produce jobs, that’s how things are made. Any discrepancies related to the bill were related to, but not caused by. I feel like this should be a go to bill for post-recession cleanup.

Works Cited

Amadeo, Kimberly. “How Congress Really Spends Your Money.” The Balance. The Balance, 22 Mar. 2017. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <https://www.thebalance.com/current-u-s-federal-government-spending-3305763&gt;.

Broda, Christian, and Jonathan Parker. “Did the 2008 US Tax Rebates Work? | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal.” Did the 2008 US Tax Rebates Work? Voxeu, 15 Aug. 2008. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <http://voxeu.org/article/did-2008-us-tax-rebates-work&gt;.

“Economic Stimulus Payment Q&As: Eligibility.” Economic Stimulus Payment Q&As: Eligibility. IRS, 16 July 2008. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <https://www.irs.gov/uac/Economic-Stimulus-Payment-Q&As:-Eligibility-&gt;.

Haugen, Steven E. “Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers in 2002.” Monthly Labor Review 126.9 (2003): 37-40. Web. 22 Mar. 2017. <https://www.bls.gov/opub/reports/minimum-wage/archive/characteristics-of-minimum-wage-workers-2014.pdf&gt;.

“H.R. 5140 (110th): Economic Stimulus Act of 2008.” GovTrack.us. Govtrack, 8 Feb. 2008. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/110/hr5140/text&gt;.

Pacitti, Aaron. “Raising the Minimum Wage Boosts Growth and Does Not Cause Unemployment.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 27 Apr. 2015. Web. 22 Mar. 2017. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/aaron-pacitti/raising-the-minimum-wage-_3_b_7152976.html&gt;.

Riedl, Brian. “Why Government Spending Does Not Stimulate Economic Growth: Answering the Critics.” The Heritage Foundation. N.p., 5 Jan. 2010. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <http://www.heritage.org/budget-and-spending/report/why-government-spending-does-not-stimulate-economic-growth-answering-the&gt;.

Silversmith, David, CPA, CFE. “Review of the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008.” Review of the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 (n.d.): 1-4. Akmcpa. Web. 27 Mar. 2017. <http://akmcpa.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Review-of-Economic-Stimulus-Act-of-2008.pdf&gt;.

ThinkProgress. “Study: A Minimum Wage Hike Would Stimulate The Economy.” ThinkProgress. ThinkProgress, 08 July 2013. Web. 22 Mar. 2017. <https://thinkprogress.org/study-a-minimum-wage-hike-would-stimulate-the-economy-f02ca75732fc#.j9lij2kxf&gt;.

Economics With Financial Literacy

The Rise of Betsey Johnsons Brand

Economics – 3.1

Betsey Johnson was born in the 40s in Terryville, Connecticut, here is where her love of dance, and eventually art, blossomed. Throughout her youth, she trained in multiple types of dance, with dance came a story, and a story meant a wardrobe. Because a large portion of dance is aesthetics, she had a teacher who allowed her to make her own costumes. This combined with her interest in art led to a want to create fashion, and a brand to establish. She later received an internship at a prestigious brand as a designer, gaining traction and eventually making her own brand. Throughout her career, she saw the rise of punk and youthquake, capitalizing on both to create a distinct brand that is known for its youthfulness and unique style. She became the punk rock wild child of the fashion industry, inspiring a plethora of designers and culture along the way.

Throughout her career, she’s had to alter her brand for the sake of making something. Specifically, in the 70s. She reverted to making older, more maternal clothing with no youthfulness after the youthquake movement died down, but she had to continue designing to stay active with her brand. So she made generic tailored clothing, that is until the 70’s. When punk hit she was re-invented, she began feeling her passion again. This was a pivotal point for her brand and impact.

Within her 30 year career, she has made all types of apparel, from swim to active to formal to shoes, she inserted her unique, youthful vision into every thread and inspired designers everywhere. Throughout this, she has beat breast cancer and still manages to cartwheel down the runway at all of her shows.

 

Works Cited

“The Best Spring 2014 Make Up.” Zimbio. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2017.

“Betsey Johnson.” Biography.com. A&E Networks Television, 20 Sept. 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2017.

“TOP 50 Best Fashion Designers.” Boca Do Lobos Inspirational World RSS. N.p., 30 Mar. 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2017.


 

Economics With Financial Literacy

T-Bonds, Futures, and Money Market; The Dichotomy Between Aggressive, Moderate, and Conservative Investment.

An Analysis of 3 Major Economic Investments and Their Future.

Economics assignment 2.04 HONORS, by Sarah Knezel.

Despite the safety of this option- the use of it is going down; according to the national statistics, only about 10% savings are bonds, a staggeringly low rate- considering T-Bonds are extremely safe and conservative. So why don’t we want bonds? The US Gov’s treasury reports the cou20-34-editpon equivalent (which is the ultimate comparison figure for nominal and discount rates), the rate is far less than the US’ inflation rate of 2.07%; except for the 13th week, there has been a general decrease in interest, making bonds an irresponsible pick in regards to what you get back. The future of government bonds looks bleak and practically nonexistent, notwithstanding its major security benefits.

The main issue with futures isn’t the futures themselves but finding information on them. Futures are high-risk private contracts between sellers and buyers, ensuring one will buy a large quantity of a product from the other at a set rate. An example of this would be you predicting a large boom in the cow population sometime next year, and signing into a future agreeing to buy a 350 dollars-worth of milk for 200 dollars. What makes this risky is that it’s an actual gamble, despite this, they do not seem to be uncommon. The fascination surround futures is the fascination of legalized betting and gambling.

Money markets are the very definition of a moderate investment option, they’re the ultimate moderate option, for high payments they offer a higher rate of return, such as anywhere from .8 to .11%, this accounts for their growing popularity in recent years. In Europe, 2009-2010, the average investor with a money market account increasedImage result for money market figures their payments from 0.59 to 0.85 percent which is no surprise considering money markets accounts persistence on keeping a competitive interest rate.

 

SOURCES:

http://www.investinginbonds.com/learnmore.asp?catid=9&subcatid=50&id=97https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=billrateshttps://www.statbureau.org/en/united-states/inflationhttp://www.bankrate.com/finance/investing/treasury-bonds-pay-interest.aspxhttps://www.personalcapital.com/blog/investing/america-turns-back-bonds/https://www.treasury-management.com/article/4/198/1710/the-continuing-popularity-of-constant-nav-money-market-funds.htmlhttps://www.fdic.gov/regulations/resources/rates/